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SOESD / Learning Matters / Newsletter Archive / October 2005 / Meth Abuse Prevention

Curriculum-Based Meth Abuse Prevention

Summary:

Jackson County Health and Human Services has provided funds to SOESD and its prevention partner SODA to help local secondary teachers create a meth abuse prevention “Tool Kit.” The purpose of the “tool kit” is to provide teachers with up to date resources that will reach students with current information about the dangers of using meth and other drugs.

The ”Tool kit” will include meth abuse prevention information and resources from national, state, regional and local sources.  Anchoring the  “tool kit” will be locally developed curriculum guide linked to state standards that will include suggestions and local resources. Locally developed resources both audio-visual and web based- online will be tested and included in cooperation with SOPTV. 

SOESD will provide funds for additional materials and training for teachers in Josephine and Klamath County teachers in the fall of 2006.  SODA will provide access to print and other prevention resources to be included with the pilot “tool kit” and will help support the development of local resources.

Project duration: 

09/05-12/06

Key Components:

  • Pilot Teachers compile and field test Meth Abuse Prevention “tool kits*” in three selected secondary schools.
    • 1.1       People Served: 200 students in pilot schools and 5 secondary teachers
    • 1.2    Outcome: By May 31, 2005 teachers and students who participated in the pilot program will show gains in understanding the consequences of meth abuse
    • 1.3     Impact: High impact curriculum module using the meth tool kit is field tested in three local secondary schools 
  • A fully mediated meth prevention “Tool Kit” is reviewed, revised and disseminated to other schools in the area.
    • 2.1   People Served:  30 secondary teachers from Jackson county and 15 teachers from Josephine and Klamath counties
    • 2.2    Outcome: By December 31, 2006, teachers who participated in the pilot program will share the revised “tool kits” with other teachers across the area
    • 2.3    Impact: Project evaluation shows that pilot teachers impart critical understanding of the scope and consequences of meth use as they roll out the revised ‘tool kit” 
  • After aTeacher Led Training, Health and other educators in Jackson and surrounding counties will use the redesigned Meth Abuse Prevention tool kits to teach their students about the problems of meth use and addiction.
    • 3.1   People Served:  2100 area youth, 80 teachers/educators
    • 3.2   Outcome: By December 31, 2006, students who participated in tool kit related activities will show gains in understanding the consequences of meth use.
    • 3.3   Impact: Project evaluation shows that area youth and educators gain critical understanding of the scope and consequences of meth use.

Pilot Teacher/Trainers:

  • Ann Thompson-Hague - Phoenix High School
  • Jim Mannenbach – Eagle Point High School
  • Mary Dimick – McLoughlin Middle School
     

SODA Liaison

Shawn Martinez

 

SOESD Project Coordination

Creative Services: Jay Matheson, Lorraine Stoeckel, Perry Young

                        

About Meth  from KCI the Anti-Meth Site

http://www.kci.org

"No one ever tries Meth just once"©

Methamphetamines are synthetic amphetamines or stimulants that are produced and sold illegally in pill form, capsules, powder and chunks.  An amphetamine is a chemical that has stimulant properties similar to adrenaline.  Like adrenaline, methamphetamines stimulate the central nervous system, and are extremely addictive.  After the effects of meth wears off, it can cause severe withdrawal that is more intense and longer lasting than both speed and cocaine.  Methamphetamines may be known as meth, crank, glass, speed, crystal, ice, batu, chalk, shabu, or zip

Meth usage has more prolonged effects on the brain and central nervous system than even cocaine or amphetamine. Withdrawal from meth is also more intense, painful, and longer-lasting than withdrawal from these other drugs. Recovery from addiction is complicated by physical and mental illnesses, particularly severe - and often suicidal - depression.

Made from common household chemicals, methamphetamine is a synthetic (or man-made) drug. The manufacturing of meth occurs everywhere; meth labs have been found in homes, cars, hotels, and many other locations. These environments often expose children to the dangers of meth production, and they are volatile chemical atmospheres for everyone involved: neighbors, children, and even the meth producers ("cooks").

Methamphetamine addiction is a growing danger in the United States and across the globe. The only way to fight it is by education.  (From the Putnam County-TN Meth Education Tool Kit http://www.metheducation.com/methfacts.html




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